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Major electronics companies back e-waste bill

October 1st, 2010

by Elana Schor, Energy and Environment Daily Three of Silicon Valley’s biggest players are throwing their weight behind a new proposal from Reps. Mike Thompson (D-Calif.) and Gene Green (D-Texas) to curb the export of used electronics to developing nations where such toxic “e-waste” can wreak havoc on the health of local populations. The House …

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Landmark E-Waste Export Bill Introduced to Stop Global E-Waste Dumping Environmentalists and Electronic Manufacturers Support Effort

September 30th, 2010

U.S. Representatives Gene Green and Mike Thompson yesterday introduced new landmark legislation – H.R. 6252, The Responsible Electronics Recycling Act of 2010 – to stop U.S. “recyclers” from dumping electronic waste on developing countries. The bill is supported by environmental groups as well as electronic manufacturers Apple, Dell, and Samsung, all of which already have policies that prohibit the export of e-waste to developing nations.

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Congress Steps Up on E-Waste Export Issue

September 29th, 2010

Yesterday a bill was introduced in Congress that would make it illegal for U.S. “recyclers” to simply export our old electronic products to developing nations, instead of actually recycling them. It’s an atrocious but widespread practice – recyclers can make more money selling our old electronics to brokers who send them to China, India, Viet …

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GAO Report Correctly Calls for e-Waste Export Controls, but Misses the Mark with Recommendation on Basel Convention

August 12th, 2010

Congress released a Government Accountability office (GAO) report today – Electronic Waste: Considerations for Promoting Environmentally Sound Reuse and Recycling – that seeks to address the management and trade of hazardous electronic wastes. The report correctly urges the EPA to deal with the massive flows of U.S. e-waste, however, the report misses the mark in recommending that the EPA put forward legislation that would ratify the Basel Convention, without first prohibiting the export of hazardous wastes such as electronic waste to developing countries.

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Federal Judge Dismissed Industry Lawsuit Against NY City E-Waste Law

June 28th, 2010

A federal court judge today dismissed the lawsuit filed last July by the electronics industry associations against the New York City electronics waste recycling law. The case was rendered moot when the New York legislature passed a statewide e-waste bill that pre-empted the City’s law. That bill was signed into law by Governor Patterson on May 28. Both the State and City laws hold the manufacturers responsible for paying for collection and recycling of old electronic products.

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NYC Judge Dismisses Industry-Led E-Waste Lawsuit

June 28th, 2010
Greener Computing

A federal court judge today dismissed a lawsuit seeking to halt the Big Apple’s electronics waste recycling law, and a similar state-wide law that pre-empted the law is going on the books.

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A Program to Certify Electronic Waste Recycling Rivals an Industry-U.S. Plan

April 14th, 2010
By Tom Zeller New York Times

Media Center – Press Coverage A Program to Certify Electronic Waste Recycling Rivals an Industry-U.S. Plan Tom Zeller, New York Times, April 14, 2010 The Basel Action Network, an American watchdog group that has sought to curb the export of toxic electronic waste from the United States, plans to begin a new certification and auditing …

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The Smoldering Trash Revolt

January 21st, 2010

Recycling is leveling off, trash is piling up and cities are broke. In a throwaway society, who should pay for waste disposal? By Melinda Burns, Miller-McCune Magazine Every time a Californian breaks the law and throws a battery into the trash, it’s a headache for someone like Kevin Hendrick. As director of the Del Norte …

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NYC E-Waste Lawsuit: Attack on Producer Responsibility

January 10th, 2010

The electronics industry wants you to think they support the concept of “producer takeback” – where they take back and recycle our old products when we are ready to retire them. In fact, most of the computer companies and now some of the television companies offer “voluntary” takeback programs, to recycle our old products. But …

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